Lose Yourself in Delft’s World Famous Pottery and Painting

Lose Yourself in Delft’s World Famous Pottery and Painting

One thing is for certain: there is nothing in the world quite like Dutch art and craftsmanship. It’s no wonder, then, that Delft, a 750-year-old town, is so famous for its painting and pottery, which is why it makes the perfect final stop on the tour aboard Panache when you’re barging in Holland.
When you lay your eyes on Delft’s historic streets and picturesque canals, you’ll understand why so many great painters and crafters were inspired to recreate them in their masterpieces. The town gave its name to the Delft School, which saw artists such as Pieter de Hoogh, Carel Fabritius and Nicolaes Maes pass through its doors. But perhaps the town’s most famous son was Johannes Vermeer, whose paintings can be found all over the world.

 

Johannes Vermeer

Vermeer’s paintings offer an extraordinary glimpse into what life was like for the people of Delft in the seventeenth century. While Vermeer’s greatest creation is widely considered to be the Girl with a Pearl Earring, it is also awe-inspiring to see the scenery that inspired his portrayals of everyday life firsthand.

Potter About Delft’s History

The Netherlands’ history is rich with arts and culture, and Delft’s is no different. The local pottery industry reaches back more than three centuries to the country’s prosperous trade relationship with China. The activities of the Dutch East India Trading Company brought valuable Chinese porcelain back to Dutch shores, which sparked a love affair with the craft.

However, trading fell off with the death of the Wanli Emperor in 1620. Dutch potters began to experiment with techniques that would imitate the highly desirable porcelain. They developed thin earthenware that they first covered with a white glaze, followed by a clear one. The beautiful blue surfaces that were produced looked similar to Chinese porcelain, and the brilliant colour came to be known as ‘Delft blue’.

A huge disaster in the town resulted in the decline of the brewing industry, but strengthened that of local pottery. In 1654, The Thunderclap, a gunpowder explosion that destroyed large parts of the town and killed and wounded many people, meant that potters were able to take advantage of the breweries that had been left empty to expand their factories and output.

Over the next 100 years, the Delft pottery grew and grew to the legacy it still holds today. On your visit, be sure to stop by the Royal Delft Pottery, which is the town’s last remaining earthenware factory. Here potters lovingly handcraft everything you see. Why not take home the perfect memento of your time barging in Holland?

Final Stop

For all of these reasons and many more, Delft is the ideal final destination on board Panache. There is arguably no better way to experience the local heritage and culture than by barging in Holland.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of luxury all-inclusive barge holidays. If you’re looking for a unique holiday experience, European Waterways can take you barging in Holland, France, Italy and other wonderful destinations in Europe. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Let Loose in Les Menuires: A Pub Crawl to (Hopefully) Remember

Let Loose in Les Menuires: A Pub Crawl to (Hopefully) Remember

Ski holidays aren’t just about zipping down slopes and eating fondue (although both are essential components). Equally important is the nightlife: going to bars, meeting new people and letting your hair down. In Les Menuires there are plenty of opportunities for a boogie, but with so many bars and pubs to choose from its hard to pick just one. I think it was for this very reason that pub crawls were invented. Thankfully for you, Les Menuires has a classic route. so put on your dancing shoes and get going.
Start at Crazy Bar

 

Pub crawls can often get off to a slow start… not at the Crazy Bar. As its name suggests, there is no room for slouching in this alpine pub with early happy hours starting between 4pm and 6pm. The bar is located in the La Croisette area of Les Menuires and gets very busy during happy hours as skiers and snowboarders make the most of the cut-price cocktails.

Le Tilbury

Also in the La Croisette area, Le Tilbury is a favourite destination for skiers and locals. With a pine wood interior and plenty of offers on spirits and beers, Le Tilbury is a welcome chance to have a breather after a heavy start to the crawl.

L’Oisans

L’Oisans has built a reputation for its great cocktails. With plenty of classics as well as cocktails you won’t have seen anywhere else, you are bound to find one you like. If cocktails are not your thing, there is also a great selection of international beers to choose from. Located in La Croisette, it is easy to find and hard to go wrong.

Le Leeberty

Leeberty, égalité, fraternité, right? In the spirit of La France get in a round of jaegerbombs and report to the dance floor. Le Leeberty is best enjoyed later on in the bar crawl when it gets busy and everyone is in the party mood. Playing Euro pop hits, the great selection of DJs and high-quality sound system is bound to get you moving. You can find Le Leeberty in Les Bruyeres, just down the road from the other bars. The trip is definitely worth the effort.

Finish at Piano Bar Le Kube

A cosy little bar until 10pm, Le Kube is frequented by skiers looking for a less busy après scene. After 10pm, however, the atmosphere changes with live music and DJ sets bringing partygoing crowds flooding in. One the swankiest bars in the La Croisette area, it’s a great place to finish off your night with and sing and dance, and maybe even a kiss if you’re lucky.

Have Fun and Stay Protected

With all that fun on and off the slopes, it’s always worth investing in winter sports travel insurance. Whether you overstretch yourself on the skis or in the bars – we have all done both, let’s be honest – winter sports travel insurance will keep you covered and ease any holiday headaches. At InsureMore we offer comprehensive low-cost travel insurance with single and multi-trip options. So don’t fret when you are on holiday, go out and have fun – we’ve got you covered.

The Goa Villa Helps You Find the Next Perfect Holiday Rental

The Goa Villa Helps You Find the Next Perfect Holiday Rental

The Goa Villa is a website that allows you to search for villas around the Goa area, in which you can have the best vacation in your lifetime.
Goa is a one of the most famous state in India. Even if you never studied the Indian geography, you probably have heard about Goa, due to its night life and electronic music center. Goa has been a Portuguese territory for more than 200 years, and if you ever visit or read about this state, you will learn that Goa people are quite proud of this heritage. Almost everything in Goa has been influenced by the Portuguese culture, such as cuisine, architecture, dancing or fashion, also, let’s not forget about the beautiful beaches and river cruises that attract thousands of tourists each month. If you ever wanted to visit India, Goa is the perfect place. But if you decide to visit it, you will have a few options regarding you’re the place to stay. You can choose a hotel or villa. You probably have stayed in a hotel and you are familiar with the experience of staying in one. Although for a day or two, hotels are the perfect choice, if you want to spend your time in relaxation together with your loved ones, a villa is a more suitable place.

 

The Goa Villa is a website that allows you to find Goa Villas for rent. If you rent a villa, you will have a home in your vacation, fitted with many bedrooms and bathrooms that can be the quarters of your family. Furthermore, you will have your own kitchen, therefore, you can go to the local market, buy the fruits and vegetables that are specific for the region, and prepare the meal the way you want. If you do not like cooking, you will be glad to know that some villas for renting include a chef that will prepare whatever you want. Another great advantage of renting a villa, is that you will have you own pool. In a hotel, you will have to share the swimming pool with all the guests, while if you rent a villa, the pool will be used only by the people living for that period.

If you want to find the perfect villa for your vacation, just go to The Goa Villa or call one of the representatives.

The Role of the Charles Darwin Foundation

 

The Role of the Charles Darwin Foundation

The Galapagos Islands have become a highly aspirational destination for wildlife lovers and those interested in the history and geology of our planet. Thousands of visitors arrive every year to embark on a wildlife cruise in Galapagos, for the opportunity to encounter the unique species of flora and fauna for which it has become famous.
There are few places more important than this remote archipelago in terms of evolutionary biology. It is here that British naturalist Charles Darwin arrived in 1835 (as part of his five-year voyage of discovery) to collect and study the specimens that would lead to the formulation of his theory of natural selection. In fact, it’s possible that the rest of the world would never even have heard of the region had it not been for the monumental discoveries of Darwin, which revolutionised our understanding of the natural world.

 

The Charles Darwin Foundation

In 1959, a team of conservationists established the Charles Darwin Foundation to “provide unique scientific solutions” to protect and preserve the islands. The foundation is a not-for-profit organisation working closely with the Ecuadorian government to promote and secure the conservation of the habitat and wildlife of the islands.

With the support of UNESCO, almost 60 years later the dedicated team at the foundation continues to work to raise awareness on a local and global level of the need to conserve this unique and fascinating area.

The Research Station

At some point in their itinerary, every visitor on a wildlife cruise in Galapagos will visit the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz. Established in 1964, the station is administered by the CDF and operates as an active breeding centre for the Giant Tortoises, one of the highest-profile animals in the archipelago. Visitors can see the tortoises at every stage of their growth – from hatchlings to the massive full-grown adults.

The valuable research undertaken by scientists, naturalists and conservationists at the CDRS includes specimen collection and archival work, monitoring wild populations, breeding programmes, and developing innovations into the sustainability of the region.

The National Park Directorate

The Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD) began operating in 1968, working with the foundation to establish the 14 rules of sustainability and responsibility, which all visitors are expected to respect. Working together, the GNPD and the CDF discovered the last remaining Giant Tortoise on Pinta Island, who came to be known as Lonesome George.

Other Work

Some of the other important conservation projects the CDF has helped to facilitate over the past 60 years include:

? The recognition by UNESCO of the GNP as a Natural Heritage Site for Humanity and a Biosphere Reserve ? Establishment of a scholarship for Ecuadorian students, many of whom have gone on to work on local conservation projects in the archipelago ? Repatriation and breeding programme for the Land Iguana ? Launch of Project Isabela (which covered the restoration of Isabela and Pinta ? Establishment of the Environmental Education Centres on Santa Cruz, Isabela and San Cristobel ? Successful extension of the World Heritage designation to encompass the Marine Reserve

Recognition of Service

The valuable work of the CDF has been recognised by a slew of international conservation awards, including the prestigious BBVA award from Spain and the Cosmos International Award from Japan. In addition it has been bestowed with the highest honour of Distinguished Achievement in Biology from the Society of Conservation.

Support for Conservation

Those who explore the region on a wildlife cruise in Galapagos can be confident that supporting sustainable ecotourism to the region helps to raise awareness of the valuable work undertaken by the CDF and the other agencies that administer the islands. If visitors commit to travelling mindfully and respecting the rules of the GNPD throughout their stay, this “living laboratory” will survive for future generations to enjoy.

Your Ultimate Guide to Traveling in Morocco

Your Ultimate Guide to Traveling in Morocco

Morocco is a truly magnificent destination with unique culture, history and many places to explore! From kasbah (fort) to the Sahara Desert, nothing will not amaze you and be attracted to this country. Many Moroccans I met were very nice, friendly, and friendly! Not to mention the fascinating places to visit and the low cost of living as well. If you are planning to visit sometime, here are some tips for traveling in Morocco. Your Ultimate Guide to Traveling in Morocco
1. Morocco is an affordable tourist destination. Although with the increasing number of tourists in recent years, it is still a relatively cheap place to visit. You can still find affordable accommodation that is located around the city center and eat cheaply.

2. Ready to bargain. Depending on what you buy, some goods on the streets and local markets can be high but very acceptable to bargain at the best price.

3. If you want to go on a journey like the Sahara Desert, you do not need to book in advance because there are travel agents anywhere that offer such tours. Sometimes, you may find a better deal directly than you do online.

4. Learn some phrases in Arabic (or French). They are the main language of instruction in Morocco. Given the increasing number of tourists there, you should be fine with English. However, knowing some keywords and phrases in Arabic (and French) can be useful when you interact with locals, especially in rural areas.

5. As a Muslim country, Morocco is still bound by religious traditions and norms on how to behave and behave in society. While this is one of the more progressive Muslim countries (especially in terms of women’s status) and more tolerant of tourists, dressing modestly is for your own sake and can save your attention and problems. Also, do not pretend to dress modestly whenever possible. It can risk attracting attention from pickpockets and false guides (wrong). Your Ultimate Guide to Traveling in Morocco

Ceramics and Châteaus: Discover Genteel Gien

Ceramics and Châteaus: Discover Genteel Gien

There’s little doubt that an essential element of all barge holidays in France is being able to dock at the myriad towns and villages that line the waterways and entice visitors in with their charms. As part of the itinerary of the hotel barge Renaissance, guests will be able to see the sights of Gien, renowned for its pottery and royal château.
Finding your Bearings

 

Prior to diving into the town, it is well worth disembarking on the south bank to take in the attractions of Gien all at once: from this vantage point, you can savour the spectacle of the river as it passes below the eighteenth-century bridge, under the watchful gaze of the sixteenth-century château.

Not even the loss of much of Gien’s historic buildings during World War II can detract from the pleasant view. Indeed, the painstaking and very convincing post-war reconstruction has done much to bury these ghosts of the past.

Marvel at Gien’s Pottery

Cultural exploration is an integral part of our barge holidays. In France, there are always abundant opportunities for the discerning traveller to discover regional produce, and Gien is no exception. The town has crafted a fine reputation for the calibre of its pottery, in particular for its Faïence pottery. Production began when Thomas Hall, an Englishman from Stoke-on-Trent who was intent on bringing high-quality English earthenware to France, established a factory in 1821.

In deciding to base his enterprise in Gien, Hall chose wisely, capitalising on the town’s physical amenities. The Sologne forest, which is in close proximity to Gien, provided a ready source of wood for the kilns. What’s more, the Loire granted access to markets throughout France (until water travel was superseded by the railways), in addition to providing sand and water for making clay.

While production continues to this day, the factory has also taken on a new guise as a museum dedicated to telling the story of the industry and shedding light on the making of these exquisite ceramics.

A Château Fit for Kings and Queens

There’s one more attraction that certainly merits a visit before you return to the hotel barge. Holidays in France are rarely complete without sojourning for a while at a château, and Gien’s has certainly welcomed its fair share of royal visitors. This elegant edifice was constructed for the use of Anne de Beaujeu, the daughter of Louis XI, in the final years of the fifteenth century. Future guests included Henri II and his wife Catherine de Médici, as well as Louis XIV, the famous ‘Sun King’.

Despite being bombed during World War II, the château was successfully restored. Since 1952, it’s housed a museum, which is dedicated to the most royal of pastimes: hunting. Through paintings, sculptures and an array of weapons and trophies from successful forays, the museum details how hunting and its depiction has developed through the centuries.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays in France. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

All You Need to Know About the Canal de la Marne au Rhin

All You Need to Know About the Canal de la Marne au Rhin

For your next barge holiday in France, why not travel down the Canal de la Marne au Rhin and discover the wonders of Alsace-Lorraine. Its complex history has made it a beautiful crossroads of French and German culture, creating the iconic wooden-beamed houses, delicious Alsatian wines and even their very own dialect. There are a variety of landscapes to admire along the way too, including rolling vineyards, breathtaking mountains and historical cities.
Length and Route

 

The Canal de la Marne au Rhin is a 313-kilometre-long stretch of water that links Paris to Alsace and Germany. An excellent route for a barge holiday in France starts in Vitry-le-François and continues towards the historic town of Bar-le-Duc. You can then travel down towards Nancy, first passing through Toul, to finish a little beyond the European Parliament in Strasbourg.

History and Feats of Engineering

Completed in 1855, the Canal de la Marne au Rhin posed a few major issues to the engineers who designed it – mainly, how to pass through the Vosges mountains and reach the Col de Saverne. Initially the canal was made to rise gradually by passing through a seventeen-lock ladder, which would create a 44-metre level change over 4 kilometres. This technique was used until 1969, at which time it was replaced by the Saint Louis Arzviller inclined plane. With this new system, the barge enters a large caisson and is either lifted or lowered up or down the slope thanks to a counter balancing weight. On a barge holiday in France with European Waterways, you’ll be 1 of 39 barges to use it. It should take about 20 minutes to complete the full journey (including entering and exiting the caisson). It is an ingenious system that uses very little electricity and only requires two men to monitor it.

Attractions en Route

Following the Canal de la Marne au Rhin lets you explore all the Alsace-Moselle region has to offer. You won’t want to pass up on the opportunity of discovering the Lehrer Crystal Glassworks once you have passed over the Arzviller slope, or of exploring the historical city of Strasbourg and taking a tour around the renowned family-run Meteor Brewery when you reach Alsace. The Lehrer Crystal Glassworks lets you immerse yourself in the world of glassblowing as you watch experts craft and cut fine glass. Once you’ve ticked that off your list, I’d recommend visiting the Cathedral in Strasbourg, with its gorgeous Gothic-style architecture, its beautifully detailed stained-glass windows and intricately carved gargoyles. There are 332 steps to climb to reach the top, but the view from up there is well worth the effort. You should also have a wander around the windy streets of La Petit France to see the picturesque Alsatian houses lined with colourful geraniums. You can then head to the Meteor Brewery. It offers guided tours on which you’ll learn the six complex stages of creating and blending that goes into making the unique flavour of this 400-year-old beer. It wouldn’t be a barge holiday in France without a little culture!

French Cruise Secrets: Marne River

French Cruise Secrets: Marne River

River Marne has inspired artists, such as Cézanne and Pissarro, for many years, and continues to inspire everyone who meets today. Barging vacations in France are an ideal way to experience the rich history of Marne, as well as learn more about technical accomplishments that help make it an important trade route across the country. French Cruise Secrets: Marne River
To the Seine: The River Marne Basics

The French waterway is 514 kilometers long and starts in the Langres highlands. The river headed west, joining the famous Seine Seine in the upper reaches of Paris. On its way through the French countryside, Marne passes through a captivating location like Meaux – famous for its ‘Prince of Cheese’ brie – and Jouarre village, home to a stunning 12th century Benedictine monastery. Along with its centuries-old heritage, this French region has an impressive wine-growing tradition. French Cruise Secrets: Marne River

The oldest lotus in France?

The Canal de Cornillon at Meaux was built about 800 years ago at the beginning of the 13th century. This canal is the oldest in France and built as a 500m short cut, bypassing a very generous watering river. In the nineteenth century, Marne became an important trade route, connecting Paris with the eastern rivers, therefore many lateral canals were built to aid its navigation. The most impressive canal is the 64-kilometer Canal latéal à la Marne, which handles a height difference of over 30 meters with 15 keys.

What to Look For in Barge Vacations in France

If you are lucky enough to sail along Marne during your barge vacation in France, there are some sites you should not miss. The countryside around the river was very important in the second world war. In fact, Château-Thierry – best known for its multiple war graves and warnings – is at the center of the last German attack on WW1. Visit the funeral that runs in Belleau Wood, which was established in honor of the 4th Marine Brigade of the 2nd Army Division of the U.S. The remains of the nearby trenches and shell holes serve as a visual reminder of the battles that occurred in this area.

With a lighter note, you should visit the delightful city of Epernay – the Champagne capital (the drink!). The famous Avenue de Champagne is lined with impressive mansions and is home to the region’s most prestigious wine producers, if not the world. You’ll find people like Moët et Chandon, Mercier, Veuve Clicquot, Pol Roger and de Castellane. As you roam around town remember that over 200 underground cave miles are under your feet. Sprinkled with some of the world’s most whiny bubbly, some of these cellars are open for tours, a wonderful introduction to the Champagne magic world.

Perhaps this glimpse of Marne River culture and history has encouraged you to venture into its waters for the next barge vacation in France. French Cruise Secrets: Marne River

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider if you are looking for a complete luxury barge vacation in France or other great destinations. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. French Cruise Secrets: Marne River

Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

For children of all ages, the opportunity to enter the fantasy world filled with the fun of the “happiest places on earth” is fascinating. The Disneyland® Paris school trip offers a hard-to-match experience of fun, but for teachers charged with the organization, it can be influenced by the logistical challenges of a passionate 30 youngsters at one of the busiest amusement parks in the world. Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth
Make Most of the magic moments

As one of the most visited tourist parks on the planet, this is not just a matter of counting the heads of students, transporting them across the Straits and directing them toward attractions. Disneyland® Paris school trips require planning and thought when things go well and every member of the group has time in their lives.

Understand the Group as Individual

Along with the standard information collected on the consent form, understanding the child as an individual is very important. This includes not only medical data on epilepsy, asthma or motion sickness, but also causes problems such as fear of darkness or altitude, and vertigo. With this knowledge, it is easier to identify rides or attractions that do not fit. Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

Planning is Paramount

One of the most valuable tools for those responsible for planning schedules is the interactive map, which can be downloaded from Park’s website. Its functionality allows the bird’s eye view from the layout to determine the location of the facility, and filters to narrow the attractions of age and interests accordingly to save time.

Know the layout

Understanding the basic thematic layout of the Park is very important. Each of the five areas has unique nuances, and how long is allocated to each will depend entirely on the needs and desires of the group.

• Main Street: The first meeting through a revolving door takes visitors and drops them straight to the United States of the nineteenth century. This is where the Disney Magic parade takes place and that is also the point of departure of the steam train.

• Frontierland: Wild West lives in Frontierland; from a trip of Thunder Mountain that stops by heart, to the gentle sensation of paddling around a large man-made lake.

• Adventureland: Is there a living child who is not fascinated by stories of pirates and adventurers in and off the high shore? Adventureland wait!

• Fantasyland: For the younger group, the miracle of the Princess Bedroom is the beginning of all these fantasy fantasies.

• Discoveryland: As for older pupils, discovering the world of lasers and futuristic space travels is exciting and even thrilling!

Visiting Walt Disney Studios® Park is another highlight for the group. It houses not only for the many cinematographic and animation technologies that are fascinating, but also for the fastest and most thrilling ride in the National Park: Rock-n-Roller Coaster.

The perfect accommodation is Vital

When children are involved, choosing the right accommodation is essential. Important points to look for are accessibility to this site (with a free shuttle bus to take the kids to and from the Park), and interesting themes to ensure the magic survives even after the end of the day.

There are several more popular visits than the Disneyland® Paris school trip. Committing to an early-focused action plan within the organization will ensure that the experience is the same as teacher fulfillment as well. Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

John Gardiner is Managing Director of The School Travel Company, a tour operator specializing in Disneyland Paris school trips and educational tours for school and youth groups to England, Europe and beyond. As a father and avid traveler, John is keen to provide students with a valuable and exciting learning experience outside the classroom. By sharing expert advice with teachers, he allows them to inspire their students and continue their studies into life. Introduce Students to the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

Live in the Dry Season in the Galapagos

Live in the Dry Season in the Galapagos

Usually, the word “dry season” conjures up arid vision, inadequate. But for the outlying islands of the Galapagos Islands, the dry season is nothing boring.
Unlike some other destinations around the world, the dry moon is actually an ideal time for nature lovers to start a wildlife voyage in the Galapagos. It does not experience a typical tropical climate, and between July and December is actually a time of great activity, migration and breeding. Live in the Dry Season in the Galapagos

What Happens During The Dry Moon?

The archipelago has two distinct seasons: dry and wet. The season here is directly influenced by the cold Humboldt Current, which mixes with warm water from the equatorial currents and causes the rich nutrients (from Humboldt) to rise to the surface. During the dry period of six months, currents are driven toward the island by prevailing trade winds, which have a profound effect on local ecology.

Animal Sea Abundance

With an abundant supply of food, marine life is growing rapidly at this time. Along with the number of fish that can be seen in shallow waters, the population of sharks, octopi, rays and crustaceans swells to a greater proportion. For sea turtles, this is the time of breeding in the prime and December marking the start of their nesting season. Live in the Dry Season in the Galapagos

High Height

The height of various volcanic islands means, even in the dry months, there is significant rainfall in some areas. On the plateau, the drizzle and mist of moist known as Garúa is a constant presence and, while under the conditions at the bottom is quite arid, fertile and tropical highlands. Therefore, large numbers of animals – like the Giant Turtles – migrate to higher ground for food. While this seasonal movement occurs on a smaller scale than Africa’s “big migration”, it is the same principle. To find very active wildlife, most trips to wildlife voyages in the Galapagos at this time of the year will include trips to several island plateaues.

Breeding time

Surprisingly, temperatures are lower during the dry months, and during this cold weather many species choose to breed. It is very common among bird species and, when their young are hatched, large numbers of small fish in the surrounding waters serve as a reliable source of food. Boobies, Frigate and Flightless Cormorants begin their marriage early in the dry season, and their numbers increase as the gliders begin to appear in the following months.

Other species that have a higher profile during this breeding period are the unique Lava lizards, migrant sharks, flamingoes, sea lions, penguins, whales and dolphins.

Dry Moon End

At the end of December, as the Humboldt Current slows and rises in temperature, there is a shift in wildlife activity that is clear as the second season of the archipelago – a wet approach. For those planning a wildlife voyage in the Galapagos, no time in a year is a bad time, but the dry season can be a fun and enjoyable time to visit.

Live in the Dry Season in the Galapagos