The Important Connection Between Alexander Hamilton and the Island of St. Croix

For David Johnson Cane Bay was an obvious choice for the headquarters of a management consulting company. He and the co-founder of Cane Bay Partners have made the island of St. Croix home for their families and their business. They know the historical connections between this particular Caribbean island and the United States.

The Virgin Islands

St. Croix is part of the U.S. Virgin Islands, which number about 50 islands. A similar number is owned by Great Britain. Most of these islands are very small, with some of them being called islets. Islets are technically too small for anyone to live on. The United States was able to make its purchase from Denmark in 1917, when the country needed a more strategic military presence.

Alexander Hamilton’s Residency

The connection between the United States and St. Croix goes back much further than this, however. For instance, Alexander Hamilton spent his adolescent years living on that island. Hamilton was the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

As a young man, Hamilton lived through a destructive hurricane that hit the Caribbean in 1772. His years in this place of residence are credited with his anti-slavery stance, since he saw firsthand the brutality of slave life on the plantations.

While working for an import-export business, Hamilton gained significant knowledge of international trade and understood the importance of a country’s sustainable fiscal policy. He learned the problems that occur when a community exports only one crop and related products, while importing numerous other supplies. St. Croix’s crop was cane sugar.

A New Home in the United States

Although the place had a vast influence on him, Hamilton did not stay there long, as he left for college in the United States. By 1777, he was a senior aide to George Washington, working with the Continental Army fighting in the Revolutionary War.

Touring Christiansted While Focusing on Hamilton

Tourists to the city of Christiansted have the opportunity to take a guided tour that focuses on Hamilton, or to create their own tour. Although most buildings from that time are no longer there, some still stand and can be viewed. The Estate Whim Museum, for instance, is an old sugar plantation.